Population genetic structure of Jeffrey pine
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Population genetic structure of Jeffrey pine

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Jeffrey pine -- Genetics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Glenn Richard Furnier.
The Physical Object
Pagination[8], 59 leaves, bound :
Number of Pages59
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14264751M

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Genetic structure of seven Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyiGrev. & Balf.) populations restricted to ultramafic soils in the Klamath Mountains of Oregon and California was compared to that of seven populations occurring on a broader range of soils in the rest of Cited by: Population genetic structure of Jeffrey pine. By. Abstract. Graduation date: Jeffrey pine occurs in the mountains of California and adjacent states. In the Klamath Mountains, the northern margin of the range, it is restricted to infertile ultramafic soils, forming very open stands of low density. It occurs predominantly on more fertile. Book. Jan ; Gerald Jacobs; View. Genetic structure of island populations of the anurans Rana temporaria and Bufo bufo. Population genetic structure of Jeffrey pine / January A study of isoenzyme loci and 12 phenotypic characters in 5 clusters of Pinus massoniana in Shaxian County, Fujian Province showed considerable genetic variation, with % of loci polymorphic, an av. of alleles per locus and an av. expected heterozygosity of Mean genetic difference between the clusters was with % of allozyme variation attributed to differences between.

proach for assessing population genetic structure and a means of comparing datasets (Nielsen, Paul, Albrechtsen, & Song, ; Slate et al., ). However, population genetics studies are concerned primarily with assessing differences between independent markers, often neglecting potential insight into gene function and genomic. Abstract. Twelve natural populations of four cedar pine species,Pinus sibirica, P. cembra, P. pumila, andP. koraiensis, occurring in the Soviet Union were investigated by starch-gel ncies of 55 alleles at 19 loci were determined. Interpopulation genetic diversity inP. sibirica andP. pumila was only 2–4 per cent of the total genetic diversity. Ancient genetic bottleneck and Plio-Pleistocene climatic changes imprinted the phylobiogeography of European Black Pine populations. European Journal of Forest Research, Vol. , Issue. , p. European Journal of Forest Research, Vol. , Issue. , p. The progressive loss and fragmentation of longleaf pine forests throughout the southeastern United States has led to severe declines in habitat specialists such as the federally listed gopher tortoise Gopherus r, little is known of the range‐wide historical genetic structure of this species or how habitat loss may have impacted the genetic diversity of this species over time.

Title: Population Genetic Structure of Jeffrey Pine Abstract approved: W. Thomas Adams Jeffrey pine occurs in the mountains of California and adjacent states. In the Klamath Mountains, the northern margin of the range, it is restricted to infertile ultramafic soils, forming very open stands of low density. It occurs predominantly on more fertile. As such, the study of population genetic structure in bark beetles has become an important step in the ongoing management of outbreak populations. In this chapter, we review the current state of population genetic structure studies as they relate to bark beetles, with a particular emphasis on pine beetles. Abstract: Our objective was to survey genetic variability and examine population structure in the endangered Red‐cockaded Woodpecker, a species whose distribution has been fragmented by land‐use patterns. Sixteen presumptive gene loci were resolved from feather pulp of nestlings and adults from 26 populations rangewide. Mean heterozygosity in the Red‐cockaded Woodpecker was % and. Population genetics would resolve many unanswered questions concerning the genetics of R. solani, as it would allow estimation of outbreeding, inbreeding, population structure, spatial orientation, and genetic variation (Adams ). The first step is to develop neutral genetic markers, which can distinguish between homo- and heterozygotes.